Monday, December 9, 2013

An anniversary of sorrow

No matter how many cases like this that we learn about, we are always shocked and saddened anew. It's never easy to write about these tragic deaths, but we are duty bound to raise awareness of the ongoing slaughter of the innocents. 

November 12th is forever tainted for Jaime, whose beloved Boxer girl, Quinn, was savagely mauled to death in front of her on that very date, four years ago. This is her story:

At approximately 7:43, my brother called. I talked to him for 12 minutes while in the garage and came back upstairs to my room. Three minutes later, I called 911.


Many of us celebrate the births of our loved ones as well as mourn the loss of our loved ones. Quinn was six, she was a boxer, she was 'just a dog', expected to live another 4-6 years.  That night, my life changed forever.  More than I could ever put into words.  I think of the little things I did wrong, the graphic details, the sounds, the sights, the smells, etc almost every night I lay my head down. Tonight is the anniversary of the attack, when the pit bulls turned on me & Quinn. 


It all happened so very fast but yet seemed to take forever.  I am not here to condemn pit bulls, I'm just here to share the life of Quinn and make others listen to the way she died.  She was so very pretty, a flashy fawn that was given to me by my pops as a Christmas present, he brought her home in a stocking.  I named her Joey for a few days and then Quinn came to be the final choice.  She went through a lot with me, during a very tough time of my life.  We moved into this new house a year before her death. 


She finally had the doggie door, free reign of the house and was finally the 'only dog'.  She always had a racquetball in her mouth, her tiny nub of a tail was always shaking, especially when she brought the turtle in from outside and thought he was a toy to push around the hardwood floors.  


The pit bulls moved in after knowing her for four years.  All she wanted, was to be a part of their bond.  She would run and play and lick their faces, thinking she was becoming a part of their pack.  I made a few mistakes, I should have listened to my gut, I should have made them go...this was her house and he promised he would never let her get hurt.  I trusted in that.  I've forgiven myself, I've accepted the way she died but I may never forgive him.  She was my girl, and I watched her fight for her life, trying to surrender to her torturers.  She screamed like a child, the blood was everywhere. I had to walk away from her, I couldn't save her.  I knew, while laying in the bathroom trying to wrap my arms around her and pick her up out of their grip, I knew that I was putting my own life in danger and could not let my family lose me in that way. Yes, my finger was crushed, my scars will always be there. But no living soul should ever have to experience what she suffered in her final moments on this earth.



I will forever share her story on this day, it's the least I can do. I have loved pit bulls in the past, and there are still a couple I love to this day - but please, please know that if ever they snap, it may be too late.  Three years and one day ago, I too was saying that it was the owner, not the dog - but I learned the lesson the hard way. The pit bulls died a very peaceful death, with me at their side, not like my girl Quinn, who was ripped apart like a wishbone in front of my face. There is no worse feeling than that helplessness, being unable to save the one who looked to you for security.


Yes, I know Quinn was just a dog, as far as the statistics go, but I often let my mind wander to what if it would have been a child or even me. I promise you, it is not worth the chance.  Keep your families safe, and this includes that little four legged dog that trusts in you as his or her only friend.  More importantly, listen to your gut. 

For more info go to dogsbite.org

17 comments:

  1. the scene in this house is beyond my comprehension. it looks like a slaughter house.
    and the details are not entirely clear to me. the mutants belonged to her boyfriend/room mate? how many mutants were there? how long had they lived there before their DNA kicked in and tore that poor dog to pieces?

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    1. The pits belonged to my boyfriend and they all moved in about 6 weeks prior to this night. They had spent many days and nights together...I never worried because I thought it was the way they were raised and they were both loved and spoiled rotten, as was Quinn. Forever changed my life.

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    2. sorry justbreathe. that is a particularly virulent nutter myth. that myth plays extremely well to animal lovers. i know because i once believed it. maybe the only thing distinguishing me from you is, i truly do not like the "positive" pit bull traits that nutters promote: never met a stranger, lick you to death, can't get close enough, exuberant, funny, clownish. plus it is the rare pit bull that doesn't strike me as hideously ugly.

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    3. Responsible Pit bull owners know that the chance of dog aggression in the breed is high,that even if treated well and socialized it still pops up. Its unfortunate that so many advocates and rescues deny it then give those dogs to ignorant yet innocent dog owners and they only find out when its to late. These people may have owned a pit or two that where never dog aggressive,thus they believe all Pits are the same way. Some really can be sweet dogs,but you just never know with fighting breeds. Plus when I try to argue that dog aggression should be bred out of the breed,it just seems to piss them off sense its considered part of the breed. A breed which I would actually own if it wasn't so dog and animal aggressive.
      I`m sorry you had to go through that,and I`m sorry for your poor sweet dog.

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    4. Pit Bull Rescue Central: It is a fact that our APBTs, ASTs and pit mixes come with a built-in fighting heritage. It doesn’t matter where we get them from, whether it be the pound, a stray we pick up, or a puppy we buy from a breeder. The majority of pit bulls will, at some point in their lives, exhibit some degree of dog-on-dog aggression ... We cannot predict when or where it will happen and we can’t love, train or socialize it out of the dog. Pit bulls may not start a fight, but they will finish it.

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  2. white carpeting is not a good idea with pit bulls unless you are a dog fighter , then its okay .

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  3. Do you find your comment to be funny? Just makes you come across as a heartless ass.

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  4. It makes me so sad to see another animals life snuffed out by someone conducting their own pit bull experiment.

    Isn't the purpose of getting a purebred dog is knowing its inherent genetic traits?

    Where in the world do people get the idea you can love out genetics.

    I have birds. I do not own bird hunting breeds as pets. Sad when common sense is not so common any more.

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    1. Every pit bull owner thinks THEY are different. THEY are the ONE that lubbed their dogs enough that they would NEVER hurt a fly. This breed needs to be banned, period.

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  5. There was a time, back in the mid 70s when I and my colleagues believed it had to be the owner. Dogs just don't kill other dogs therefore it had to be human agency causing this. Within a few years we were no longer so naive. Some dogs, dogs breed for extreme prey drive and aggression DO kill other dogs or anything else that crosses their paths. They were selectively bred for this and nothing else. They attack and kill because they really enjoy it. I'm so very sorry for your loss.

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    1. ALEXANDRA SEMYONOVA, animal behaviorist


      You will also not prevent the dog from being what he is genetically predisposed to be. Because the inbred postures and behaviors feel good, fitting the body and brain the dog has been bred with, they are internally motivated and internally rewarded. This means that the behavior is practically impossible to extinguish by manipulating external environmental stimuli. The reward is not in the environment, but in the dog itself! As Coppinger and Coppinger (2001, p. 202) put it, “The dog gets such pleasure out of performing its motor pattern that it keeps looking for places to display it.”

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    2. This is never more clear than watching a dead game dog who is being killed continue to scratch back into the dog who's killing him.

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  6. Thank you for sharing your intimate and painful story (and photos). They speak a million words.

    I am sorry for your loss.

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  8. The only way some people will learn the truth about pit bulls is for them to have a personal, bloody, gruesome, violent, horrible experience. Otherwise if someone tries to tell them the truth about pit bulls, they say, ----It's how you raise them---. I've heard that response so many times it sounds like a tape recorder. Or---- Not all pit bulls are bad dogs.---- I never said all pit bulls are bad dogs, but know this, every pit bull has the potential to turn bad.

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  9. Reading how your boxer played with them showed red flags.... I honestly don't know how people can own animals and not understand basics of their behavior. Face licking is not some cute kissy kissy love from one dog to another... We try to make our animals human by thinking they are just like us... They aren't. Face licking is a sign of dominance, and knowing how boxers play, I'm sure that wasn't the only sign. YOU have to be the dominant one, over all the dogs in your home, that cute thing you think is the dog loving you as her mommy and putting her arm over you, ya, no that's dominance. You cannot let that take place. Keep treating your dogs like they understand reason and logic and this story will repeat itself.

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    1. Right. I had no idea as a dog owner that I needed certified dog training to raise dogs. Nor does 98% of other owners. I never knew I needed to train the pits NOT to kill...

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